Are Plant Based Diets Behind Boom In Pulses?

The amount of pulse acres has doubled in the last five years in a Canadian province
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The popularity of vegan diets 'might' have impacted the rising success of pulses, Canadian farmers say.

Pulses - which have been branded as a 'superfood' and include peas, beans, lentils, and chickpeas - are on track to be in high demand in 2018, Alberta Pulse Growers chairman D' Arcy Hilgartner said.

Alberta Pulse represents 6,000 pulse farmers, who work over two million acres of land across the province - with the amount of pulse acres having doubled in the last five years.

According to Hilgartner, 'the future of pulses is bright' - and plant-based diets 'might' have something to do with it.

The boom in pulses could be attributed to the rising number of vegans

Vegan

Now the rising number of people following animal-free diets is one potential driver of the boom the pulse industry is experiencing.

"The popularity of vegetarian, vegan and gluten-free diets might have something to do with the success of pulses, as well," media outlet CBC reports.

"It isn't hurting," Hilgartner said of the impact of veganism on the growing popularity of pulses.

"Obviously as a farmer, I grow more than just peas... but it's giving people an option, and options are good."

Hilgartner has also touted the benefits of pulses in one's diet, saying: "Not only the high protein and high fibre, but [we're] finding it in diets for chronic diseases like diabetes or coronary heart disease."

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PBN Contributor:

Diana is a London-based writer dedicated to bringing you the latest updates in ethical consumerism and plant-based nutrition. She is a recent media graduate with extensive journalistic experience, and writes in hopes of changing the narrative. You can follow Diana on Instagram and Twitter @dianalupica

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Disclaimer: The opinions expressed in this article are prepared in the author's capacity and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of Plant Based News itself. 

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