This Start-Up Is Turning Beer Waste Into Vegan Milk

It offers a sustainble, nutritious, and delectable drink that comes in several flavors
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The vegan start-up is upcycling millions of pounds of beer into plant-based milk (Photo: Canvas)

The vegan start-up is upcycling millions of pounds of beer into plant-based milk (Photo: Canvas)

Vegan start-up Canvas will be launching its first barley milk beverage made out of beer waste this fall.

The new U.S.-based company is looking to transform 'spent grain' - the leftover fiber and plant-based protein - into 'saved grain', as the company likes to call it.

Canvas blends the 'spent grain' with cashews, coconut milk, pea protein, and flavorings such as matcha and turmeric.

The milk

Canvas co-founder Sarah Pool was intent on finding a way to make use of the beer waste.

"The grains have been making this amazing product - beer - but what's left over is just as amazing. 

"Here's a ton of fiber and protein, sitting there, waiting to become better," Pool told Munchies.

Canvas will offer a sustainable, nutrient-dense drink that comes in five flavors: Original, Cocoa, Cold Brew Latte, Matcha, and Turmeric Chai.

It is 100 per cent plant-based, contains no refined sugars, and no artificial ingredients.

Goal

The aim is to 'turn as much spent grain into saved grain as possible to expand access to better nutrition for everyone'.

Pool added: "The beverage is a new frontier in sustainable nourishment."

Canvas is committed to upcycling the 8 million pounds of spent grain that go to waste every year.

"We're in the midst of an obesity epidemic, a third of the world's population is malnourished - there's so much that can be done with spent grain," says Pool.

Canvas has just closed its crowdfunding campaign onKickstarterwith staggering success: at almost double its initial goal of $25,000.

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