Fish Oil Supplements Have 'No Protective Effects' For Heart

A major study has debunked the long-health belief
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A young woman crosses her hands over her heart

Fish oil supplements are not as beneficial as thought, according to the study (Photo: Giulia Bertelli)

The health benefits of taking omega-3 fish oil supplements have been massively overrated, according to a major new study by Cochrane.

Despite the product's reputation for protecting heart health, scientists looked at trials in over 100,000 people over a 10-year period - and found no significant proof that the supplements prevent heart disease.

They concluded that the chance of omega-3 fish oil supplements yielding any meaningful benefit is a tiny one in 10,000.

'Don't see protective effects'

Cochrane lead author, Dr Lee Hooper, from the University of East Anglia, said: "We can be confident in the findings of this review which go against the popular belief that long-chain omega-3 supplements protect the heart.

"This large systematic review included information from many thousands of people over long periods. Despite all this information, we don't see protective effects.

"The review provides good evidence that taking long-chain omega-3 [fish oil, EPA or DHA] supplements does not benefit heart health or reduce our risk of stroke or death from any cause. The most trustworthy studies consistently showed little or no effect of long-chain omega-3 fats on cardiovascular health."