Experts Say To Avoid Processed Meat, Eat More Plants To Cut Cancer Risk

The report recommends a diet 'rich in whole grains, vegetables, fruits and legumes'
Author:
Publish date:
The WCRF recommends little to no consumption of red and processed meats

The WCRF recommends little to no consumption of red and processed meats

A new
report aimed at preventing cancer advises against processed meat consumption
entirely - and recommends a diet 'rich in whole grains, vegetables, fruits, and
legumes'.

Risk
factors

The preventative guide,
released by The World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF), offers ten key suggestions
for reducing cancer risk.

While the
WCRF recommends limiting red meat intake, it is advised that 'little, if any' processed meat should be consumed - and that iron and protein are both nutrients readily available in plant foods.

This
follows a study released earlier this year which says consumption of 'ultra processed' foods, processed
meat inclusive, results in greater health risks overall - including that of
breast cancer.

The WCRF recommends physical activity to decrease cancer risk

The WCRF recommends physical activity to decrease cancer risk

Prevention

Aside from a list of substances to avoid - which also includes alcohol and sugary drinks - the WCRF's guideline includes proactive measures one can take to reduce cancer risk.

The recommendations include consuming diet 'rich in whole grains, vegetables,
fruits and legumes', maintaining a healthy weight, and being physically active.

Diet and
weight

Data
suggests that the dietary recommendations alone could, in turn, foster a healthy body
weight - as the WCRF found a 'Western-type
diet' high in meat to be associated with weight gain and obesity.

This is further supported the findings of other recent studies, including that of the Journal of
the American College of Nutrition
,
in which researchers found a plant-based
diet to be a more effective weight loss tool than a calorically equivalent diet
containing animal products.

The WCRF's Dr. Giota Mitrou said: "Our cancer prevention recommendations work together as a blueprint to beat cancer that people can trust, because they are based on evidence that has now proved consistent for decades."