California Proposes Ban on Animal Tested Cosmetics

The plans are supported by animal welfare campaigners
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Animals suffer in cosmetics testing (Photo: Cruelty Free International)

Animals suffer in cosmetics testing (Photo: Cruelty Free International)

California has introduced the Cruelty Free Cosmetics Act to end the sale of animal-tested cosmetics in the state.

If passed, the bill would 'make it unlawful for any cosmetic manufacturer to knowingly import or sell any cosmetic, including personal hygiene products such as deodorant, shampoo, or conditioner, in California if the final product or any component of the product was tested on animals after January 1, 2020'.

The bill wants to bring Californian law in line with regulations in more than 30 countries including the EU, Norway, Israel, and India which already prohibit the sale of new animal-tested cosmetics.

Success

Monica Engebretson of Cruelty Free International said: "Our success in ending cosmetics testing on animals in the European Union and now in a growing number of countries has proven that a cruelty-free cosmetics market is possible.

"We applaud California for introducing this bill to ensure that cosmetics sold in the state are safe and humane."

Kristie Sullivan, M.P.H., Vice President of Research Policy with the Physicians Committee, added: "Banning animal-tested cosmetics in California will encourage manufacturers to clean up their act and stop selling animal-tested products across the United States.

"Passage of the California Cruelty-Free Cosmetics Act would be a win for human and animal lives."

The bill could save animals' lives

The bill could save animals' lives

Leader

According to Cruelty Free International: "California has led the way in promoting modern alternatives to animal tests.

"In 2000, California became the first state to make it unlawful to use animals for testing when an alternative method is available.

"In 2014, the state passed the Cruelty Free International sponsored - Cruelty Free Cosmetics Resolution - which called on Congress to prohibit animal testing for cosmetics and to phase out marketing animal-tested cosmetics."

Act

The introduction of the Act - by Senator Cathleen Galgiani - follows the introduction of similar plans in New York and Hawaii.

"California has long been a leader in promoting modern alternatives to animal tests," said Senator Cathleen Galgiani.

"Inaction at the federal level compels California to lead the way in ensuring a cruelty-free cosmetics market for its citizens by barring any new ingredients or cosmetics that are tested on animals."