Australian Initiative 'No Meat May' Set To Attract Record Number Of Participants For 2018

The scheme encourages people to ditch meat - and all animal products - throughout the month
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More people than ever are said to be signing up for the scheme (Photo: Brooke Cagle)

More people than ever are said to be signing up for the scheme (Photo: Brooke Cagle)

Australian initiative - No Meat May - which encourages people to ditch meat as well as other animal products for 31 days - is set to attract record numbers of participants this year.

The scheme - which is in its sixth year - touts the health, environmental and ethical benefits of eating more plants, as well as the positive impact eating less meat could have on global hunger.

According to organizers, each participant in No Meat May will save at least 31 animals, avoid 7kgs of meat consumption and prevent approximately 108kgs of CO2 from being released into the atmosphere.

'No strings attached'

According to Co-founder Ryan Alexander, No Meat May gives participants a 'no-strings-attached' opportunity to remove meat from their diets for a relatively short period of time, and in doing so, to make a tangible difference to their health, the wellbeing of animals and the environment.

He said: "If just 20 percent of Aussies participated in No Meat May, they would collectively save over 124 million animals and over 430,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide in just that one month.

"Animal agriculture is a leading cause of climate change, rainforest destruction, species extinction, ocean dead zones, and fresh water consumption and it takes more than nine times the fossil fuel to produce one calorie of meat than it does for one calorie of plant protein.

"Once you start looking into it, the drivers to switching to a more plant based diet are hard to argue with."

A plant-heavy diet is better for the planet

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'Positive'

No Meat May Co-founder, Guy James Whitworth, adds that the No Meat May movement focuses on the 'positive and proactive elements of challenging one's thoughts and behaviours, and the adventure of trying a different way of life.

He said: "Food should be about fun, pleasure and nourishment. While our message is inherently serious, no one wants to be preached to, and we believe behavioural change should be an exciting adventure, and a dabble with reinvention.

"We recognise that people change incrementally over time and No Meat May provides a safe stepping stone, evidence-based information, and support for that bold first step.

"There are so many exciting reasons to engage and inspire people to become plant powered superheroes."

You can take part in No Meat May bysigning up online here- participants are given access to plant-based recipes and nutritional guidance, as well as a range of special events at the No Meat May 'HQ' in Sydney – including a conservation photography exhibition and plant-based cooking classes.

You can follow No Meat May onFacebook,Twitter, andInstagram