Paris To Ban Wild Animals In Circuses Over Cruelty Concerns

'Animals forced to perform will always suffer – the only humane option is to keep them out of circuses altogether'
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Campaigners say being forced to perform causes extreme suffering for animals (Photo: Adobe. Do not use without permission)

Campaigners say being forced to perform causes extreme suffering for animals (Photo: Adobe. Do not use without permission)

Paris is set to ban wild animals in circuses following the adoption of a resolution last week.

Under the resolution, circuses that apply to operate in Paris while using wild animals will be denied permits from 2020.

Wild animals in circuses

France has not yet passed a national ban on the use of these animals - predominantly lions as well as tigers, elephants, and parrots, among others - despite polls showing the majority of French people are against the practice, and despite multiple towns and cities having their own bans.

According to reports, between 500 and 1,000 wild animals are still confined in dozens of circuses in the country.

Muriel Arnal, president of animal protection organization One Voice told AFP that they 'live in tiny, tiny cages inside trucks. They have nowhere to hide, they are stressed, and also they have nothing to do. Then they are taken out for the show or for...training, which is very violent...They are never at peace'.

Between 500 and 1,000 wild animals are reportedly held captive by circuses in France (Photo: Adobe. Do not use without permission)

Between 500 and 1,000 wild animals are reportedly held captive by circuses in France (Photo: Adobe. Do not use without permission)

'A barbaric practice'

Vegan charity PETA welcomed the news, saying: "Forcing wild animals to perform confusing tricks is a barbaric practice that has no place in a compassionate society.

"Animals in circuses have been either born in captivity or taken from their homes and enslaved – solely for the sake of entertainment. They're condemned to a sad and frustrating existence – carted from one venue to another in cramped cages and barren trailers – and trained to perform tricks under the threat of punishment.

"As the British Veterinary Association has said, 'the welfare needs of non-domesticated, wild animals cannot be met within the environment of a traveling circus, especially in terms of accommodation and the ability to express normal behavior'.

"In other words, animals forced to perform will always suffer – the only humane option is to keep them out of circuses altogether."