40 Cases Of 'Non-Compliance' In Animal Experimentation Revealed In Government Report

The report shows severe cases of animal neglect and a failure to meet basic standards - leading to extreme animal suffering
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A rabbit in a lab

Many animals suffer as a result of non-compliance in labs (Photo: Adobe. Do not use without permission)

The Home Office's latest annual report on animal experimentation has 40 cases of 'non-compliance' with the law or conditions of licences to carry out research on animals.

These include a range of incidents, from cases of unauthorized procedures to failures to provide food and water.

Vegan concern

Vegan organization Animal Aid has called the cases of non-compliance 'extremely worrying', saying: "We are constantly assured that animal experiments are conducted in the most highly regulated ways.

"However, the report paints a very different picture, with instances of neglect and oversight and a failure of basic standards."

Animals dying from neglect

Among the cases cited in the report, a monkey died after becoming trapped between a cage wall and a 'restraint mechanism'. This was caused by staff failing to use the cage correctly.

A license holder bred 13,200 more genetically altered mice than the 2,500 which were authorized.

And a license holder tried to kill a rat with CO2, then tried to break the animal’s neck to confirm his death. He was then placed in a freezer and when found 40 minutes later he was still alive.

According to Animal Aid: "The typical action taken against those who experiment on animals and commit such terrible acts is a 'letter of admonition', retraining, or perhaps having a license revoked."

'Pathetic' penalties

"Once again, this shocking annual report outlines numerous instances where the most basic needs of animals are not being met, leading to immense suffering and death," Jessamy Korotoga, Animal Aid Campaign Manager, said.

"When this does happen, the penalties are, quite frankly, pathetic.

"Animal Aid and its supporters are urging all those involved in animal experiments to instead embrace advanced, cutting-edge technologies that are not reliant on outdated and unreliable experiments on animals."